Resources

Resources on Cognitive Frailty

What is Cognitive Frailty?

Presentation by network PI, Carol Holland at the CFIN ECR Summer School on Cognitive Frailty and Ageing (June 2023)

Resources on interdisciplinary work

The what and how of interdisciplinarity

Presentation by Amanda Ellison at the CFIN ECR Summer School on Cognitive Frailty and Ageing (June 2023)

Scoping reviews on Cognitive Frailty

Scoping review on the exogenous factors and biological mechanisms for cognitive frailty

Presentation by network PI, Carol Holland at the Centre for Ageing Research (C4AR) Research Showcase  in Lancaster on the Scoping review on the exogenous factors and biological mechanism for Cognitive Frailty (December 2023), including gap analysis.

C4AR website: https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/health-and-medicine/research/c4ar/

 

Understanding exogenous factors and biological mechanisms for cognitive frailty: a multidisciplinary scoping review

Carol HollandNikolett DraveczLauren OwensAlexandre BenedettoIrundika Dias, Alan GowSusan Broughton

The full scoping review is currently in preprint. You can read the full article here: https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2024.01.18.24301491v1

The scoping review considered research across the behavioural and life sciences. Over 8,800 papers were initially identified, with 1,017 considered for full-text screening and 223 ultimately included. Mechanisms associated with cognitive frailty were categorised. Many risk factors are also known risk factors for dementia. The review highlighted differences in symptoms and functional changes that distinguish cognitive frailty from dementia. Underlying mechanisms and intervention targets to alter the trajectory from having either physical frailty or cognitive impairment to having both were considered, based on the premise that cognitive frailty is potentially reversible. Factors included the fundamental roles of socioeconomic and sociocultural factors, revealing potential pathways linking inequalities, gender, habitat and ethnicity to cognitive frailty and poorer quality of life, need for health and social care support and restricted independence.

 

Evidence synthesis on Cognitive Frailty –  The effect of social engagement, air quality and access to green spaces on cognitive frailty 

Presentation by network Co-I, Sally Fowler-Davies  and Charlotte Benkowitz from Sheffield Hallam University at the CFIN ECR Summer School on Cognitive Frailty and Ageing (June 2023)

A Scoping Review of the Effects of Ambient Air Quality on Cognitive Frailty

James Robert Hodgson, Charlotte Benkowitz, Brian C. Castellani, Amanda Ellison, Rammina Yassaie, Helen Twohig, Roshni Bhudia,Otto-Emil Ilmari Jutila and Sally Fowler-Davis
Doi: https://doi.org/10.3390/environments11010004

You can read the full article here: https://www.mdpi.com/2076-3298/11/1/4

The scoping review shows that moderate long-term ambient air pollution appears linked to increased risk of cognitive frailty, and its effects may be more detrimental to elderly people with existing conditions, including economic and health inequalities. The results suggest earlier and more active interventions are needed to protect older people and air quality appears to be a critical risk factor even at levels below World Health Organisation targets.

 

Green spaces and the impact on cognitive frailty: a scoping review

Sally Fowler Davis, Charlotte Benkowitz, Lucie Nield, and Chris Dayson

Doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2023.1278542

Read the full article here: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpubh.2023.1278542/full

The scoping review shows evidence that suggests a beneficial role of green space exposure on cognitive functions. Results suggested that poorer urban environments are high risk for older people’s mental health and these places often lack parks and green spaces, furthermore, the level of activity and social participation may be greater with access to green spaces and therefore reduces health risks.

A Scoping Review on the Opportunities for Social Engagement and Cognitive Frailty in Older Adults

Sally Fowler Davis, Charlotte Benkowitz, Carol Holland, Alan Gow, Charlotte Clarke

Doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/phrs.2024.1606494

Read the full article here: https://www.ssph-journal.org/journals/public-health-reviews/articles/10.3389/phrs.2024.1606494/full

Cognitive frailty (CF) is defined as the clinical syndrome of the combination of physical frailty and cognitive impairment, without dementia. Numerous risk factors for CF have been previously identified but this scoping review focusses on the critical need for social engagement and the association with cognition. The focus of this scoping review on the opportunity for social engagement rather than on perception or experience of loneliness. Based on the results of 55 studies were synthesised into four social engagement categories, namely participation, household, network, and habitat. Social engagement is associated with maintaining or improving cognition, particularly through active participation in social roles. Habitat (i.e., rural or urban settings) also influences cognition and the challenge is to enable social participation.